Monthly Archives: January 2020

CI/CD & Test Automation for Dynamics 365 in Azure DevOps/VSTS -Part 5 – Master Data Deployment

In my previous blog, I wrote about how to set up a gated check-in, In this blog, we will see how to move the master data from source to target instance using our CI/CD pipeline.

Generally, we use the configuration migration tool to move the master data across multiple environments and organizations. Configuration data is used to define custom functionality in model-driven apps in Dynamics 365, such as Dynamics 365 Sales and Customer Service, and is typically stored in custom entities. Configuration data is different from end-user data (account, contacts, and so on). A typical example of configuration data is what you define in the Unified Service Desk for Dynamics 365 to configure a customized call center agent application. The Unified Service Desk entities, along with the configuration data that is stored in the entities, define an agent application.

Note: Disable plug-ins before exporting data and then re-enable them on the target system after the import is complete for all the entities or selected entities.

Master data/Configuration data deployment

undefinedDefine the schema of the source data to be exported: The schema file (.xml) contains information about the data that you want to export such as the entities, attributes, relationships, definition of the uniqueness of the data, and whether the plug-ins should be disabled before exporting the data.

undefinedUse the schema to export data: Use the schema file to export the data into a .zip file that contains the data and the schema of the exported data.

undefinedImport the exported data: Use the exported data (.zip file) to import into the target environment. The data import is done in multiple passes to first import the foundation data while queuing up the dependent data, and then import the dependent data in the subsequent passes to handle any data dependencies or linkages.

Instead of moving it manually we are going to automate this above process using Azure DevOps.

Pre-requisites

  • Please make sure the latest configuration.xml(generated using DataMigrationUtility.exe tool) is generated and placed in the desired input location.
  • Please make sure we have updated the variables (correct connection string, CRM username, CRM password) in both the VSTS build and release definition.               

VSTS Build Definition

We have to create a separate Build Definition for moving the master data from source to target instance. Once the solution movement is done this below build definition should trigger.

In my previous blog, I have explained how to create a new build definition. Please refer to that for creating a new build definition.

What will do – It will connect to the source instance and export the master data using the configuration.xml and push it to artifacts repository

In this Build Definition we have used the following MSCRM Build Tools tasks:

  • MSCRM Tool Installer – Installs the Dynamics 365 tools required by all of the tasks
  • MSCRM Export config migration data – Exports data from a CRM instance using a Configuration Migration schema file (How to prepare configuration schema file).

You have to update the connection string variable name and select the configuration.xml input location.

  • Publish build artifacts – Publish build artifacts to Azure Pipelines

Release Definition

Once the above definition gets succeded, this Release Definition will trigger automatically and performs the following tasks:

  • MSCRM Tool Installer – Installs the Dynamics 365 tools required by all of the tasks
  • MSCRM Import config migration data – Import data exported using Configuration Migration Tool into a CRM instance

You have to update the connection string variable name and select the exported data zip from the artifacts repository(drop).

This will import the master data/configuration data into our Dynamics Online sandbox instance.

In my next blog, we will see how to integrate the unit testing framework with the VSTS Build definition.

If you are interested in this topic and would like to do some further self-study I encourage you to check out my blog on this.

CI/CD & Test Automation for Dynamics 365 in Azure DevOps/VSTS -Part 4 – Gated Check-in

In my previous blog, I wrote about how to set up a VSTS Release definition. In this blog, I am goint to explain the gated-check-in but before heading to it. We must know why we need gated check-in

Gated check-in helps to restrict developers from checking in a broken code into a source control system and thus helps to avoid blocking your team. With gated check-in when check-in is initiated by a developer, it will build the project and will check-in the code only if the build is successful. Gated check-in is suitable for projects whose overall build time is less than a few minutes.

C# we have used StyleCop and FxCop and for JavaScript and Jquery we have used JSHint

StyleCop for the custom code such as Plugins, Workflows, Actions, and WebApi.

Consider there is a group of developers working together and each one writes the code in the exact same way.

More often than not, one isn’t better than the other and it’s just a matter of taste. In a team or in a single project, it’s more important to be consistent than it is to choose the right style.

Agreeing on a style can be hard enough, but enforcing it shouldn’t be something you do manually. It will be tedious and error-prone.

StyleCop is a tool that can automate this. Let’s have a look at how to set it up.

What is StyleCop?

StyleCop analyzes C# source code to enforce a set of style and consistency rules.

StyleCop used to be a Visual Studio plugin and a NuGet package. You can still use this in Visual Studio 2019, 2017 etc.

Installing StyleCop

To add StyleCop to your project, right-click your project in Visual Studio’s Solution Explorer, and choose “Manage NuGet Packages?”:

https://i0.wp.com/blog.submain.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/ManageNugetPackages.png?w=328&ssl=1

Search for “StyleCop.Analyzers” and install the latest stable version:

Installing-NuGet-package

Once it is installed, you build the project solution. You might get the below StyleCop warnings.

  • Add XML comments
  • Generate an XML documentation file (this can be set in the project properties)
  • Add a file header (e.g., copyright information)
  • Put the “using” statements inside the “namespace” block
  • Put braces on a new line
  • Add an empty line between the two method definitions (Output2 and Output3)

Setup

The first step in integrating StyleCop into an MSBuild system is to obtain the default StyleCop MSBuild targets file. To do so, run the StyleCop installer, and select the MSBuild files option on the Custom Setup page. This will install the StyleCop MSBuild files into the {Program Files}\MSBuild\StyleCop folder.

Adding the Import Tag

Once the StyleCop MSBuild files are installed, the next step is to import the StyleCop targets file into your C# projects. This is done by adding an Import tag to each C# project file.

For example, to integrate StyleCop to the project SampleProject, open the project file SampleProject.csproj within your favorite text editor. Scroll down to the bottom of the file and add a new tag to import the StyleCop.targets file. This import tag should be added just below the import of Microsoft.CSharp.targets:

Code
<Project DefaultTargets=”Build” xmlns=”http://schemas.microsoft.com/developer/msbuild/2003″&gt;   …Contents Removed…   <Import Project=”$(MSBuildBinPath)\Microsoft.CSharp.targets” />   <Import Project=”$(ProgramFiles)\MSBuild\StyleCop\v4.4\StyleCop.targets” />   …Contents Removed… </Project>          

Save the modified .csproj file. The next time you build this project either within Visual Studio or on the command line, StyleCop will run automatically against all of the C# source files within the project.

Build Warnings Vs Errors

By default, StyleCop violations will show up as build warnings. To turn StyleCop violations into build errors, the flag StyleCopTreatErrorsAsWarnings must be set to false. This flag can be set as an environment variable on the machine, or within the build environment command window. Setting the flag this way will cause StyleCop violations to appear as build errors automatically for all projects where StyleCop build integration is enabled.

Alternately, this flag can be set within the project file for a particular project. Open the .csproj file for your project again, and find the first PropertyGroup section within the file. Add a new tag to set the StyleCopTreatErrorsAsWarnings flag to false. For example:

Code
<Project DefaultTargets=”Build” xmlns=”http://schemas.microsoft.com/developer/msbuild/2003″&gt;   <PropertyGroup>     <Configuration Condition=” ‘$(Configuration)’ == ” “>Debug</Configuration>     <Platform Condition=” ‘$(Platform)’ == ” “>AnyCPU</Platform>     <ProductVersion>8.0.50727</ProductVersion>     <SchemaVersion>2.0</SchemaVersion>     <ProjectGuid>{4B4DB6AA-A021-4F95-92B7-B88B5B360228}</ProjectGuid>     <OutputType>WinExe</OutputType>     <AppDesignerFolder>Properties</AppDesignerFolder>     <RootNamespace>SampleProject</RootNamespace>     <AssemblyName>SampleProject</AssemblyName>     <StyleCopTreatErrorsAsWarnings>false</StyleCopTreatErrorsAsWarnings>   </PropertyGroup>            

The configuration described above will suffice to enable StyleCop build integration on an individual development machine. However, development teams working within a well-defined development environment can set up the build integration in a more global way, so that each developer does not have to manually install StyleCop on his machine.

To do this, copy all of the files from {Program Files}\MSBuild\StyleCop into a custom folder within your build environment, and check all of these files into your source control system. Next, define an environment variable within your development environment which points to the location of the StyleCop targets file. For example:

set StyleCopTargets=%enlistmentroot%\ExternalTools\StyleCop\v4.4\StyleCop.targets

With this configuration in place, it is simply a matter of adding the following import tag to each .csproj file within your development environment:

Code
<Import Project=”$(MSBuildBinPath)\Microsoft.CSharp.targets” /> <Import Project=”$(StyleCopTargets)” />          

StyleCop will automatically run each time this project is built, no matter which developer is building the project. There is no need for each developer to install StyleCop manually, since the StyleCop binaries are checked directly into your source control system and are centrally integrated into your build environment.

What is CodeAnalysis?

To integrate Code Analysis in build, unload and edit project and add following tags. Note that paths might be different depending on Solution configuration.

<ItemGroup>
    <CodeAnalysisDictionary Include="$(SolutionDir)\CodeAnalysisDictionary.xml" />
</ItemGroup>
<Import Project="$(SolutionDir)\ExternalDlls\StyleCop 4.7\StyleCop.targets" /> 

Code Analysis configuration

Configure project Debug configuration to use Code Analysis rules in Solution root. Do the same for the Release configuration. Only difference is that in debug mode Code Analysis should not be run because it slows down the build. We keep CA running in Release to get error report from continues integration and to allow easily turning CA on by altering solution mode from Debug to Release.

Once the above step is done, please commit the project solution files in Azure DevOps/VSTS repository.

How to enable Gated Check-in VSTS build definition.

Go to Build definition -> Triggers-> you can see the gated check-in as follows:

Check the gated check-in checkbox. Now gated check-in is enabled for this particular build definition.

In my next blog, we will see how to move the master data from source to target instance using our CI/CD pipeline.

If you are interested in this topic and would like to do some further self-study I encourage you to check out my blog on this.